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https://www.test.storyboardthat.com/articles/e/homophones

A Tale of Then vs. Than and There vs. They’re vs. Their

Solid understanding of grammar is key for student reading and writing success. However, many concepts of grammar are difficult to grasp and rely more on memorization than deduction. It’s important that grammar topics are addressed early and often in student writing, and that they are consistently repeated over the entirety of a child’s school years.

Understanding the difference between homophones (like "write" and "right") meets Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts. Additionally, they are necessary to grow students’ writing skills, and improve important markers of ELA progress, such as state test scores and written responses.

"Then/than" and "there/they’re/their" are great examples of how grammar concepts can be made engaging by incorporating them into storyboards. Providing visual homophone examples is a perfect way for students to associate the words alongside context rather than just from definitions.

Then/Than

Then is used when sequencing events in terms of time.

I came home from school, then I got a snack.

Than is used when making comparisons.

Jason is taller than Derek.


There/They’re/Their

There is used to reference a specific place.

I left the donuts there this morning.

They’re is used to describe what multiple people are doing. It is easier to distinguish because it is a contraction smashing together the two words "they" and "are".

They’re at the store getting Oreos.

Their is a plural possessive. This indicates a thing or things belongs to multiple people.

Their dog is crazy

Incorporating Storyboards Into Grammar Exercises

Usually these concepts are demonstrated through examples and then students memorize them with repetitive grammar drills. While consistent practice of grammar skills is important, it’s equally important to keep students engaged in the work. This will allow learning objectives to sink in and stick with your students.

Storyboarding is a perfect way for students to demonstrate their knowledge of the differences between "then/than" and "there/they’re/their", while exercising their creative talents. The clear, concise structure of storyboards allows teachers to immediately determine whether students have mastered the objectives. To increase practice and further ingrain learning, teachers can assign students to create multiple storyboards, and use more examples, allowing students to fully internalize the objectives, while still giving them the opportunity to have fun and be creative.


Some engaging ways teachers can teach homophones like "then/than", and "there/they’re/their" using storyboards are:


  • Have students create their own storyboards for both "then/than" and "there/they’re/their". In each cell of the board, students are required to come up with a clear example sentence utilizing the correct form of each word, and a picture that describes it.
  • Students can create storyboard pictures for sentences containing "then/than" or "there/they’re/their" from reading or class. They then can come up with the justification for the chosen iteration of the word in the cell.
  • For an assessment, teachers can create a storyboard with pictures and sentences, where key words are blanked out. Students must then use sentence and storyboard context clues to fill in the blanks.

Common Homophones List

  • you | ewe | yew
  • raise | rays | raze
  • sun | son
  • blue | blew
  • hear | here
  • ware | wear | where
  • sell | cell
  • buy | bye | by
  • one | won
  • so | sew | sow
  • ball | bawl
  • we | wee
  • plain | plane
  • mind | mined
  • sea | see
  • pair | pear | pare
  • eight | ate
  • piece | peace
  • to | too | two
  • our | hour
  • witch | which
  • dear | deer
  • flower | flour
  • write | right
  • break | brake
  • die | dye
  • pray | prey
  • way | weigh
  • weather | whether
  • allowed | aloud
  • cent | sent | scent
  • steel | steal
  • rose | rows
  • not | knot
  • tail | tale
  • maze | maize

How to Teach Students to Use Homophones in Puns and Wordplay Using Storyboards

1

Introduce Homophones and Wordplay

Begin by introducing the concept of homophones (words that sound the same but have different meanings) and wordplay (the use of language for humorous or creative effect). Provide examples of puns and wordplay that utilize homophones to demonstrate the power of using similar-sounding words for humorous or clever wordplay.

2

Explore Homophone Puns in Literature and Media

Engage students with examples of homophone puns in literature, advertisements, cartoons, and comedy shows. Discuss how homophone puns can add humor, create double meanings, and engage the audience through clever wordplay.

3

Teach Students to Identify Homophones

Provide a list of common homophones and engage students in activities to identify and match homophones with their correct meanings. Use visuals and context to help students understand the different meanings associated with each homophone.

4

Create Storyboards with Homophone Puns

Guide students in creating storyboards that incorporate homophone puns and wordplay. Encourage them to use visuals and dialogue to illustrate the double meanings and create humorous or clever situations.

5

Share and Evaluate Storyboards

Allow students to share their storyboards with the class, presenting their homophone puns and wordplay. Facilitate a discussion to evaluate the effectiveness of the puns, considering the humor, creativity, and clarity of the wordplay.

6

Reflect and Refine

Engage students in reflecting on their experience of creating homophone puns and wordplay through storyboards. Encourage them to refine their puns and wordplay techniques, considering feedback from peers and making revisions to improve their storytelling skills.

Frequently Asked Questions about Teaching Homophones With Storyboards FAQs

How can storyboards help teach homophones in the classroom?

Storyboards are a great visual tool for teaching homophones. Students can use images and text to create a visual representation of the homophone pair, which helps to reinforce the meaning and spelling of each word. Teachers can also use a variety of fun activities to teach homophones in the classroom, such as creating homophone scavenger hunts, playing homophone bingo, and challenging students to come up with silly sentences that use homophones. These activities help to engage students and make learning about homophones more enjoyable.

How can storyboards help teach homophones in the classroom?

Storyboards are a great visual tool for teaching homophones. Students can use images and text to create a visual representation of the homophone pair, which helps to reinforce the meaning and spelling of each word. Worksheets can be used to provide additional practice and reinforcement for students learning about homophones. These worksheets can include activities such as matching homophone pairs, filling in the blank with the correct homophone, and using homophones in context.

What are some fun and creative activities that teachers can use to teach homophones in the classroom?

Teachers can use a variety of fun activities to teach homophones in the classroom, such as creating homophone scavenger hunts, playing homophone bingo, and challenging students to come up with silly sentences that use homophones. These activities help to engage students and make learning about homophones more enjoyable. They can also create homophone riddles, engage students in homophone charades, and have students create their own homophone storybooks. These activities help to make learning about homophones more engaging and memorable for students.

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