Search
  • Search
  • My Storyboards
https://www.test.storyboardthat.com/lesson-plans/esl-activities/simple-tenses
START YOUR 14 DAY FREE TRIAL NOW!
START YOUR 14 DAY FREE TRIAL NOW!

Activity Overview


Students can practice the past, present, and future tenses by making a chart of their accomplishments in different stages of their lives! This simple chart allows students to practice their English grammar skills while also sharing about themselves as well as their hopes and dreams for the future. As this activity is three cells, it is a perfect introduction to the Storyboard Creator or the use of different tenses. Students will love finding characters and scenes to represent themselves when they were young, as they are now, and in the future as adults!


Template and Class Instructions

(These instructions are completely customizable. After clicking "Copy Activity", update the instructions on the Edit Tab of the assignment.)



Due Date:

Objective: Create a storyboard that shows you in the past, present, and future. Describe what you are doing in each using the correct verb tenses for past, present and future.

Student Instructions:

  1. Click "Start Assignment".
  2. Using the template provided write your name on the left side of the chart.
  3. Add an illustration and description of you in the past. Describe what you did and what you enjoyed as a baby or small child.
  4. Add an illustration and description of you in the present. Describe what you do now and what you enjoy.
  5. Add an illustration and description of you in the future. Describe what you hope to be doing in the future. What will you be? What will you enjoy?

Lesson Plan Reference

Switch to: Common CoreArizonaCaliforniaColoradoFloridaGeorgiaIowaKansasMarylandMassachusettsNebraskaNew JerseyNorth CarolinaOhioOklahomaPennsylvaniaTexas

Rubric

(You can also create your own on Quick Rubric.)


Past, Present, Future Tense
Students will make a storyboard that shows themselves in the past, present and future with illustrations and descriptions. Their descriptions will focus on the correct verb tense for each to demonstrate their understanding of the past, present and future verb tenses.
Proficient
5 Points
Emerging
3 Points
Beginning
1 Points
Writing and Grammar usage
All of the descriptions are detailed and complete. They are written using the correct verb tenses in the past, present and future.
Most of the descriptions are detailed and complete. They are written using the correct verb tenses in the past, present and future with only a few grammatical errors.
Only some of the descriptions are complete. There do not use the correct verb tenses.
Illustrations
All of the illustrations clearly depict the written descriptions using appropriate characters, scenes and items.
Most of the illustrations depict the written descriptions using appropriate characters, scenes and items. Some are unclear or unfinished.
Only a few of the illustrations depict the written descriptions using appropriate characters, scenes and items. Most are unclear or unfinished.
Effort
All of the work is complete, thorough, and neat. It is evident student put forth a lot of effort.
Most of the work is complete, thorough, and neat. It is evident student only put forth some effort.
Only some of the work is complete, thorough, and neat. It is evident student did not put forth adequate effort.


How to Teach Past, Present, and Future Tenses Using Life Timeline Charts

1

Introduction to Tenses and Timeline Concept

Begin the lesson by introducing or reviewing the past, present, and future tenses. Use simple sentences to illustrate each tense, emphasizing the time aspect associated with each. Then, introduce the concept of a timeline chart and explain how it can represent different stages of life.

2

Brainstorming Personal Milestones

Have students brainstorm significant events in their lives. Encourage them to think of past achievements (e.g., learning to ride a bike), present activities (e.g., studying English), and future goals or aspirations (e.g., going to college). This step helps students gather content for their timeline charts.

3

Creating Life Timeline Charts

Provide students with materials to create their timeline charts. Students should plot their past, present, and future events along the timeline. Encourage them to use sentences in the appropriate tenses for each event. This activity allows students to apply their understanding of tenses in a personal and creative way.

4

Presenting and Discussing Timelines

Allow students to present their timeline charts to the class or in small groups. Encourage them to explain their timelines, using the correct tenses as they talk about each event. This presentation not only reinforces their understanding of tenses but also enhances speaking and listening skills.

Frequently Asked Questions about Past, Present, and Future Tenses

How Do I Choose the Correct Tense to Use in Different Situations?

Choosing the correct tense in different situations primarily depends on the time frame of the action or event you are describing. For past events, use the past tense; for actions occurring in the present, use the present tense; and for future events, use the future tense. The context often dictates the tense: use the past tense for completed actions or events that occurred at a specific time in the past, the present tense for current actions, habitual routines, or general truths, and the future tense for actions or events that are planned or expected to happen. The complexity increases with the perfect and continuous aspects, which add layers of meaning regarding the completion or duration of actions. For example, use the present perfect for actions that started in the past and continue to the present, and the future continuous for actions that will be ongoing at a specific time in the future.

How Do Irregular Verbs Affect Tense Usage?

Irregular verbs significantly affect tense usage because they do not follow standard conjugation patterns, especially in the past and past participle forms. For instance, the past tense of 'go' is 'went', not 'goed'. This irregularity requires memorization and practice, as using the incorrect form can lead to misunderstandings. In the case of perfect tenses, knowing the past participle form is crucial, as it is used with auxiliary verbs to construct these tenses (e.g., "I have seen," not "I have saw"). Irregular verbs are a common source of errors for English learners, necessitating extra attention and practice.

How Do Time Expressions Work with Different Tenses?

Time expressions are key indicators that help determine the appropriate tense. Phrases like 'yesterday', 'last week', or 'in 2010' typically signal the past tense, while 'now', 'currently', or 'at the moment' indicate the present tense. For the future, expressions like 'tomorrow', 'next year', or 'in the future' are used. Time expressions can be particularly helpful in complex tenses; for instance, 'for' and 'since' are often used with the present perfect to indicate duration from the past up to the present. Understanding how these expressions align with different tenses is crucial for accurate and clear communication in English.




This Activity is Part of Many Teacher Guides

*(This Will Start a 2-Week Free Trial - No Credit Card Needed)
https://www.test.storyboardthat.com/lesson-plans/esl-activities/simple-tenses
© 2024 - Clever Prototypes, LLC - All rights reserved.
StoryboardThat is a trademark of Clever Prototypes, LLC, and Registered in U.S. Patent and Trademark Office