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Activity Overview


.Students can practice the conditional tense and the parts of a house by creating a storyboard about their dream home. Teachers can begin by having a discussion where students brainstorm answers to the prompt: "If I won the lottery, my dream home would be ..." Then, students can create a narrative storyboard that describes and illustrates the different parts of their "dream home" including the outside, their bedroom, living room, kitchen, bathroom, backyard, and more. Students can use speech bubbles within the illustrations and descriptions below the illustration to practice writing using the conditional tense and using different vocabulary related to the home. Teachers can have students present their storyboards when they are finished to include practice speaking as well as writing!


Template and Class Instructions

(These instructions are completely customizable. After clicking "Copy Activity", update the instructions on the Edit Tab of the assignment.)



Due Date:

Objective: Create a storyboard describing your "dream house" using grammatically correct conditional statements (Ex. My dream bedroom would have ... )

Student Instructions:

  1. Click "Start Assignment"
  2. Using the template provided describe each part of your dream home.
  3. Don't forget to use the conditional tense.
  4. Create pictures using scenes, characters and items to illustrate the different parts of your dream home.

Lesson Plan Reference

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Rubric

(You can also create your own on Quick Rubric.)


Conditional Tense
Students will make a narrative storyboard answering the prompt "If I won the lottery, I would . . . " with illustrations and descriptions that employ the correct usage of the conditional tense.
Proficient
5 Points
Emerging
3 Points
Beginning
1 Points
Writing and Grammar usage
All of the descriptions are detailed and complete. They are written using the correct conditional tense.
Most of the descriptions are detailed and complete. They are written using the correct conditional tense with only a few grammatical errors.
Only some of the descriptions are complete. There do not use the conditional tense.
Illustrations
All of the illustrations clearly depict the written descriptions using appropriate characters, scenes and items.
Most of the illustrations depict the written descriptions using appropriate characters, scenes and items. Some are unclear or unfinished.
Only a few of the illustrations depict the written descriptions using appropriate characters, scenes and items. Most are unclear or unfinished.
Effort
All of the work is complete, thorough, and neat. It is evident student put forth a lot of effort.
Most of the work is complete, thorough, and neat. It is evident student only put forth some effort.
Only some of the work is complete, thorough, and neat. It is evident student did not put forth adequate effort.


How to Introduce the Conditional Tense with 'My Dream Home' in an Elementary School Classroom

1

Introducing the Concept of Conditional Tense

Begin the lesson by explaining the conditional tense. Use simple, relatable examples to illustrate how it works, such as, “If I had a magic wand, I would...” Transition to the theme of 'My Dream Home' by explaining how the conditional tense can be used to talk about things that are possible or imagined, like a dream home.

2

Brainstorming Session for 'My Dream Home'

Engage the students in a brainstorming activity. Ask them to think about what their dream home would look like. Prompt them with questions like, “If you had a dream home, what would be in it?” Encourage them to think about different rooms, colors, and special features. This step helps students start formulating their ideas in the conditional tense.

3

Creating 'My Dream Home' Descriptions

Have students begin creating sentences using the conditional tense to describe their dream home. Provide sentence starters to aid younger students, such as “If I had a dream home, it would have…” or “My dream home would include…” This exercise helps them practice using the conditional tense in a fun and imaginative context.

4

Illustrating 'My Dream Home

Turn the descriptions into a creative art project. Give students drawing materials and ask them to illustrate their dream home based on the descriptions they’ve created. As they draw, encourage them to explain their drawings using the conditional tense, reinforcing their understanding and usage of this tense in a practical and engaging way.

Frequently Asked Questions about Conditional Tense: My Dream Home

Why Use the Conditional Tense for Describing a Dream Home?

Using the conditional tense to describe a dream home is particularly effective because it involves discussing hypothetical or imagined scenarios. The conditional tense, especially the second conditional (using "would" plus the base form of a verb), is ideal for expressing wishes, dreams, or situations that are currently unreal but possible in the future. For example, saying "If I had a dream home, it would have a large garden" allows learners to explore imaginative ideas while practicing a key grammatical structure.

Can the Conditional Tense Be Used to Describe Realistic Plans?

Regarding the use of the conditional tense for realistic plans, it's more common to use the first conditional, which is used for real or possible situations. This tense typically follows the structure of "if" plus the present simple, and then "will" plus the base verb. For instance, "If I save enough money, I will buy a house" implies a real plan or intention. The first conditional is thus suited for situations that are likely to happen and depend on a specific condition being met.

What Are the Different Types of Conditional Tenses?

There are generally four types of conditional sentences in English, each serving a different purpose. The zero conditional (using the present simple in both clauses) describes general truths or laws of nature, like "If water reaches 100 degrees Celsius, it boils." The first conditional, as mentioned, is used for real or possible situations. The second conditional (using the past simple with "would" plus the base form of the verb) is for hypothetical situations in the present or future. Lastly, the third conditional (using "had" with "would have" plus the past participle) talks about hypothetical situations in the past, situations that did not happen, like "If I had known about the sale, I would have gone shopping." Each type serves a unique purpose and is used based on the likelihood and time frame of the situation being discussed.




This Activity is Part of Many Teacher Guides

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